Your story: Alex Lendon thanks All Ears for bringing his situation to light

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First off I’d like to thank the All Ears Campaign for bringing to light my current situation and potentially saving my hearing for years to come!

I do consider myself someone who is quite aware of the dangers of loud noise environments, having owned multiple pairs of Alpine’s MusicSafe Pro earplugs since I began regularly attending club nights and festivals.

Despite this, I have still developed mild tinnitus and have slight hearing loss in my left side through consistent overexposure to loud music. Luckily for me it does not affect my life severely as you may have read about in other peoples’ accounts. My experience of tinnitus only becomes apparent in very quiet environments or if I really focus. Thinking back, I have had this for some time, with it worsening significantly after being in club environments or listening to music for long periods of time.

What a lot of people don’t realise is that hearing damage is not simply based upon how loud the exposure is, it also involves duration of exposure. For someone like me who is constantly consuming music, simply having your headphones up a bit too loud can really cause damage. Considering I may have sometimes hit 12 hours of exposure on long work days, one or two parties at a weekend, either as a punter or behind the decks, I quickly rack up a lot of fatigue on the old eardrum. To put things into perspective 8 hours at 85 dB (the threshold for damage) causes as much damage as 4 hours at 88 dB, 2 hours at 91 dB, or just 15 minutes at 100 dB. Considering some clubs may reach up to 110+ dB you can now clearly see the dangers of going without protection.

Fortunately, I have come across this early on, and if not for having been aware of some of the dangers prior to now it might have been much worse! I now ensure I use my plugs at all events I attend and whilst using headphones I limit the volume to safe levels. A handy tip I discovered to avoid that underwhelming feeling of low volume is to start from zero and increase it gradually until you are at a comfortable and safe listening level.

Written by Alex Lendon
Alex DJs under Goat The Human

If you have a story similar to Alex's, comment below to let him know, or share your story with us to get a free pair of earplugs. If you help the community, the community will help you!